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Napa: (707) 377-1007

Benicia: (707) 377-1005

Sonoma: (707) 940-1001

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Federal Small Business Codes


CAGE: 9HRG0
UEI: GU39U1Q3V8S1
CA Small Business Supplier: ID#0000187127
Cert ID: 2030501
National Minority Business ID: WR07769

Napa: (707) 377-1007

Benicia: (707) 377-1005

Sonoma: (707) 940-1001

Petaluma Coming Soon!

PATIENT
PORTAL
BOOK
ONLINE

Federal Small Business Codes


CAGE: 9HRG0
UEI: GU39U1Q3V8S1
CA Small Business Supplier: ID#0000187127
Cert ID: 2030501
National Minority Business ID: WR07769

Health & Wellness

UTI Treatment

In Napa, Sonoma and Benicia

Suffering from a UTI? Need Antibiotics? We got you covered in Napa, Benicia and Sonoma or from anywhere in CA with a video visit.

If you feel the need to pee often, experience pain while peeing or have pain in your side or lower back, you may be suffering from a UTI or urinary tract infection.

A UTI is a very common infection that affects the bladder, kidneys, and the tubes that link them.  When bacteria infects any part of this tract, it can cause a Urinary Tract Infection.

UTIs can affect anyone and are very common, although women are more likely to get them than men. Statistics show that Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common outpatient illness in the United States. 50-60% of adult women get a UTI at some point in their life. 

Although anyone can get a UTI at any age, it’s more likely that you’ll get a UTI as you get older.  Women aged over 65 are twice as likely to get a UTI as women in all age groups.

How Are UTIs Treated?

The good news is that most UTIs are treatable by a short course of antibiotics.  If you are suffering these symtoms and are concerned about the possibility of a UTI, we can see you on short notice even without an appointment at one of our clinics in Napa, Sonoma, or Benicia. We’ll diagnose your symptoms, take a urine sample and will prescribe antibiotics if needed on the same day.  We take most health insurance plans and also offer discounts for those who pay with HSA, FSA or debit cards. 

You don’t need an appointment although you are welcome to make one through our online scheduling system.

Quick and Easy 

  • Start with a video visit, or come on in even without an appointment.
  • We take most insurance plans – even Kaiser!
  • We’re open on the weekend in Napa and Benicia.
  • Unlike an emergency room, we have short wait times.
  • Click below to see open time slots and book an appointment or simply walk-in to one of the three clinics.  No appointment is required. 
  • The Urgent Care clinics are managed by Dr. Ian Ahwah, a local emergency medicine doctor who has 25 years of clinical experience.
Urgent Care + TeleHealth Staff
Doctor with patient

What are the Symptoms of a UTI?

There are two types of urinary tract infections, each with unique symptoms.

  • Lower UTI is when the bladder or urethra (the tube that expels urine from the body) is infected.

The symptoms include cloudy, foul-smelling urine that may also include blood. You will likely need to urinate more frequently than usual and may experience some pain or discomfort when urinating, have unexpected urges to urinate, or feel as though you can’t empty your bladder.

  • Upper UTI is when the kidneys or the ureters are infected. (Ureters are the tubes that connect the kidneys to the bladder). Although an upper UTI can have similar symptoms to a lower UTI, there are some additional symptoms you might feel such as fever, pain in the sides or back, chills, feeling nauseous or confused.

Upper UTIs are more severe than lower UTIs, and if left untreated, they can cause kidney damage or spread to the bloodstream leading to other complications.

Can I schedule a video visit if I have a UTI?

Yes. You can talk to us on a video visit to get started. However, we recommend that you visit one of our clinics in Napa, Sonoma or Benicia to  diagnose and treat a UTI because you’ll need a urinalysis (urine analysis).

How do people get UTIs?

The majority of the time, the urethra is the pathway by which stomach bacteria enter the urinary tract. This can happen during sex or when using the bathroom.

You are more likely to develop a urinary tract infection if you have kidney stones that can block the tract or use condoms coated with spermicide. A condition is more likely to occur in those who use a urinary catheter which is a tube that drains urine from the bladder. Men with an enlarged prostate gland can also experience blockage to the urinary tract which increases the likelihood of a urinary tract infection.

What groups are at risk for UTIs?

A woman may be more prone to developing UTIs since her urethra is shorter than a man’s and is nearer to the anus.

Women who have undergone menopause, are pregnant, or engage in sexual activity have higher chances of getting a UTI. In general, when you have diabetes, taking immuno-suppresive drugs(chemotherapy, psoriasis, lupus etc) medications, the body’s level of defense is reduced, leading to higher cases of UTI.  Men can also develop UTIs, but because their urethras are longer, they are less prone to do so, unless they have prostate problems.

How are UTIs diagnosed at Urgent Care + TeleHealth?

At  Urgent Care + TeleHealth though there are various means of diagnosing a UTI. A standard method is through an in-office urinalysis. In this test, the characteristics of your urine are checked for any signs of infection or other health problems that may impact your urinary tract. A small sample is obtained and tested using current methods to determine if your urine includes bacteria, blood, sugar, or other elements that could point to a UTI.

Your urine sample may occasionally be sent to a lab for a urine culture test. In this case, the results should be ready in 3-4 days.

Never attempt to treat a UTI on your own, as this can be dangerous and may not effectively treat the infection – especially if it is brought on by bacteria unaffected by your current medication. As a result, it is recommended that you get medical advice for an accurate diagnosis and course of treatment for UTIs. 

How are UTIs treated at Urgent Care + TeleHealth?

The typical treatment for UTIs is antibiotics. Most women receive a supply of antibiotic tablets or capsules that they take for three days. Pregnant women, and those with more severe symptoms could require a more extended antibiotic treatment.

Typically, your UTI symptoms will go away 3 to 5 days after taking the drug.

Even if you feel better, finish the entire course of antibiotics your doctor has given you. Please do not share your antibiotics or take antibiotics that were prescribed for someone else because they may not be the right drug for your illness.

Over-the-counter pain relievers like Tylenol or Advil can help with any discomfort. In addition, we recommend that you stay hydrated and drink many liquids to help the bacteria to get flushed out.

It is crucial to get medical attention if you are at a higher risk of getting a UTI, such as if you are older or suffer from a chronic illness.

Does Urgent Care + TeleHealth take insurance for UTI diagnosis and treatment?

Yes. We accept most insurance plans and the cost of testing and treatment for a UTI is typically covered by insurance, although co-pays and deductibles apply depending on your plan. Please call us if you have questions.  

Keep in mind that UTIs are treatable, but can become a more serious kidney infection that may need hospitalization if untreated or poorly managed.

References
  1. Medina, M., & Castillo-Pino, E. (2019, January). An introduction to the epidemiology and burden of urinary tract infections. Therapeutic Advances in Urology, 11, 175628721983217. https://doi.org/10.1177/1756287219832172
  2. Geerlings S. E. (2016). Clinical Presentations and Epidemiology of Urinary Tract Infections. Microbiology spectrum, 4(5), 10.1128/microbiolspec.UTI-0002-2012. https://doi.org/10.1128/microbiolspec.UTI-0002-2012
  3. NHS Inform. (n.d.). Urinary tract infection (UTI). Retrieved from https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/kidneys-bladder-and-prostate/urinary-tract-infection-uti
  4. Bono, M. J., Leslie, S. W., & Reygaert, W. C. (2022). Urinary Tract Infection. In StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing.
  5. Flores-Mireles, A., Hreha, T. N., & Hunstad, D. A. (2019). Pathophysiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection. Topics in spinal cord injury rehabilitation, 25(3), 228–240. https://doi.org/10.1310/sci2503-228

 

Testimonials

What They Say

Friendly and efficient staff! Made an appointment the night before, easy process. Good location too.

I was greeted promptly and taken back in a timely manner. Both the assistant and the PA were friendly and professional. I’m very happy with the care I received.

Really nice people there and very professional services. I highly recommend!

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